Broward New Times 05.05.16 : Page 22

browardpalmbeach.com browardpalmbeach.com | MUSIC PREVIEWS | ▼ Music WITH A$AP TWELVYY AND REMY BANKS. 7 P.M. WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, AT REVOLUTION LIVE, 100 SW THIRD AVE., FORT LAUDERDALE. TICKETS COST $21 PLUS FEES VIA TICKETMASTER.COM. Flatbush Zombies [O’Donnell] plays keyboards, trumpet, guitar, and cowbell, and Mat [Uychich] is a fan-tastic drummer with an incredible amount of rhythm. Because of them, this isn’t just poetry in front of a rattly acoustic guitar, though there is still room for that, obviously. You have a distinctive twang to your singing voice — was that some-thing you had to work toward? New Times Broward-palm Beach NEW TIMES BROWARD-PALM BEACH Flatbush Zombies move much quicker and rap more fluidly than any of the undead from The Walking Dead or Game of Throne s — but it is such pop-cultural nerd phenomena that infected the three hip-hoppers and has them wreaking havoc on the underground scene. Their debut album, 3001: A Laced Od-yssey , features a cover illustration by a penciller of Deadpool comic books portray-ing MCs Meechy Darko, Zombie Juice, and Erick “The Architect” Elliott look-ing like sinister, animated creatures who might steal the Gorillaz’ lunch money. Their recent video for “Bounce” was a visual homage to the popular, ultraviolent videogame Grand Theft Auto, and they pep-per their lyrics with all kinds of pop refer-ences, from the comic books they grew up reading to the Stanley Kubrick movie that inspired the name of their top-ten album. Growing up in Brooklyn, Flatbush Zom-bies met in elementary school in the ’90s, where they bonded over Dragonball Z and hip-hop — though it appears drugs became another major influencer as they grew older. The Zombies dubbed their first mixtape D.R.U.G.S. and have said they began referring to themselves as zombies after the first time they ate mushrooms, when their egos “died.” “You know what people say about us. It’s the same shit people say now — it’s about the drugs. They’re not getting the message behind it. People are morons,” Darko recently vented to SF Weekly . “I talk about being addicted, so that’s not glorification. If fighting addiction is glorification, then I don’t know. I guess I just can’t rap about anything anymore.” A little digging yields the meaning be-hind the acronym D.R.U.G.S. It stands for Death and Reincarnation Under God’s Su-pervision, and the group’s second mixtape, | music | dish | film | Culture | Art | stAge | Night+dAy | News | pulp | CoNteNts | | MUSIC | DISH | FILM | ART | STAGE | NIGHT+DAY | NEWS | PULP | CONTENTS | It’s all natural, baby. People ask if I do vocal warmups. If I did vocal warmups and still sounded the way I sound, I’d be pissed. With my voice and the music, it was more important for people to hear us than for it to be good. In my singing, there’s a lot of emotion that I think people can con-nect with, whether my voice was beautiful like an opera singer or whether my voice sounded like a guy who had never sung be-fore but had a microphone in front of him. How was playing Coachella? Photo by GDP BetterOffDead, could be taken as a mes-sage that perhaps you should just say no. Flatbush Zombies’ 2016 studio debut, Laced Odyssey , is a somewhat different strain, a concept album bringing together themes from their previous tapes. In the same inter-view with SF Weekly , Elliott explained the evolution. “With this album, I was going for something that was more cinematic. Our pre-vious projects were about what we were going through at the time, but they weren’t albums. This is 12 tracks totally weaved together on purpose to be an odyssey, to be a journey. This is something that no one has ever heard from Flatbush Zombies before.” DAVID ROLLAND The Front Bottoms: Here to entertain. The Front Bottoms WITH BRICK & MORTAR AND DIET CIG. 6:30 P.M. TUESDAY, MAY 10, AT REVOLUTION LIVE, 100 SW THIRD AVE., FORT LAUDERDALE. TICKETS COST $17 PLUS FEES VIA TICKETMASTER.COM. Brian Silla, the self-effacing singer of the Front Bottoms, doesn’t like to describe himself as a singer/songwriter. Song-writer, yes — he’s always working on verse — but it’s his qualities as a singer that have him poking fun at himself. Fans of his New Jersey-bred four piece (of which there are many — the group’s lat-Brian Sella : When I was 4 years old, my dad had this old jukebox that would play Sting albums. I had to let my fingers get a little bit bigger, and then in eighth grade, I got an acoustic guitar and I learned to play the chords. The guitar then wasn’t a means of transportation; it was a vehicle for poetry. It was the lyrics that I was really passionate about. I learned the chords I needed to know — I think they call it three-chord rock ’n’ roll. Is three-chord rock ’n’ roll a philosophy you continue with the Front Bottoms? New Times : When did you fall in love with music? est album, Back on Top, recently peaked at number 32 on the charts) would beg to differ. The raw twang of Silla’s voice shows emo-tion and a sense of humor, both of which come through naturally when New Times catches up with the rising talent on his song-writing process, his voice, and the Front Bottoms’ recent Coachella experience. What can the audience expect from your show at Revolution? It was amazing. We were fortunate to play bigger festivals in Europe, so in my head I was like, How much bigger can this be? Ev-eryone kept saying Coachella is the biggest, Coachella is the best, and they were right. We played at 2:30 in the afternoon on Friday, and there were people there! The hanging out was the best part. Once we got the show done, we got to mix and mingle with the celebrities. We saw Guy Fieri, Seal — Kanye West walked by. I was extremely impressed with everyone we saw play. LCD Soundsys-tem, Sufjan Stevens, Ice Cube, even Guns N’ Roses. It was an honor to be included. There’s that thing people talk about when they go to raves where you feel you’re not an individual, you’re part of a whole. Not that Front Bottoms shows are like raves, but there is that sense that everyone is here together to have a good time. We have stuff like whacky inflatable-arm guys, we’ve got bubble machines, the whole nine yards to keep it as entertaining as possible. I always say — in fact, they’re going to write it on my tombstone — “I’m not here to perform. I’m here to entertain.” DAVID ROLLAND Totally. I think if there’s a message to deliver, the simpler the better. Fortunately, I’m able to play with extremely talented musicians. Tom [Warren], who plays bass, is a classically trained guitar player. Ciaran Feedback@BrowardPalmBeach.com Stay Plugged In. All our ads, all the time, all online. M ay 5-M ay 11, 2016 M ONTH XX–M ONTH XX, 2012 on N adindex.browardpalmbeach.com For Advertising Opportunities Call: 954-233-1569 Online Display Ads 22 22

Music Previews

Flatbush Zombies

WITH A$AP TWELVYY AND REMY BANKS. 7 P.M. WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, AT REVOLUTION LIVE, 100 SW THIRD AVE., FORT LAUDERDALE. TICKETS COST $21 PLUS FEES VIA TICKETMASTER.COM.

Flatbush Zombies move much quicker and rap more fluidly than any of the undead from The Walking Dead or Game of Thrones — but it is such pop-cultural nerd phenomena that infected the three hip-hoppers and has them wreaking havoc on the underground scene.

Their debut album, 3001: A Laced Odyssey, features a cover illustration by a penciller of Deadpool comic books portraying Mcs Meechy Darko, Zombie Juice, and Erick “The Architect” Elliott looking like sinister, animated creatures who might steal the Gorillaz’ lunch money.

Their recent video for “Bounce” was a visual homage to the popular, ultraviolent videogame Grand Theft Auto, and they pepper their lyrics with all kinds of pop references, from the comic books they grew up reading to the Stanley Kubrick movie that inspired the name of their top-ten album.

Growing up in Brooklyn, Flatbush Zombies met in elementary school in the ’90s, where they bonded over Dragonball Z and hip-hop — though it appears drugs became another major influencer as they grew older. The Zombies dubbed their first mixtape

D. R.U.G.S. and have said they began referring to themselves as zombies after the first time they ate mushrooms, when their egos “died.”

“You know what people say about us. It’s the same shit people say now — it’s about the drugs. They’re not getting the message behind it. People are morons,” Darko recently vented to SF Weekly. “I talk about being addicted, so that’s not glorification. If fighting addiction is glorification, then I don’t know. I guess I just can’t rap about anything anymore.”

A little digging yields the meaning behind the acronym D.R.U.G.S. It stands for Death and Reincarnation Under God’s Supervision, and the group’s second mixtape, BetterOffDead, could be taken as a message that perhaps you should just say no.

Flatbush Zombies’ 2016 studio debut, Laced Odyssey, is a somewhat different strain, a concept album bringing together themes from their previous tapes. In the same interview with SF Weekly, Elliott explained the evolution. “With this album, I was going for something that was more cinematic. Our previous projects were about what we were going through at the time, but they weren’t albums. This is 12 tracks totally weaved together on purpose to be an odyssey, to be a journey. This is something that no one has ever heard from Flatbush Zombies before.” DAVID ROLLAND

The Front Bottoms

WITH BRICK & MORTAR AND DIET CIG. 6:30 P.M. TUESDAY, MAY 10, AT REVOLUTION LIVE, 100 SW THIRD AVE., FORT LAUDERDALE. TICKETS COST $17 PLUS FEES VIA TICKETMASTER.COM.

Brian Silla, the self-effacing singer of the Front Bottoms, doesn’t like to describe himself as a singer/songwriter. Songwriter, yes — he’s always working on verse — but it’s his qualities as a singer that have him poking fun at himself.

Fans of his New Jersey-bred four piece (of which there are many — the group’s latest album, Back on Top, recently peaked at number 32 on the charts) would beg to differ. The raw twang of Silla’s voice shows emotion and a sense of humor, both of which come through naturally when New Times catches up with the rising talent on his songwriting process, his voice, and the Front Bottoms’ recent Coachella experience.

New Times: When did you fall in love with music?

Brian Sella: When I was 4 years old, my dad had this old jukebox that would play Sting albums. I had to let my fingers get a little bit bigger, and then in eighth grade, I got an acoustic guitar and I learned to play the chords. The guitar then wasn’t a means of transportation; it was a vehicle for poetry. It was the lyrics that I was really passionate about. I learned the chords I needed to know — I think they call it three-chord rock ’n’ roll.

Is three-chord rock ’n’ roll a philosophy you continue with the Front Bottoms?

Totally. I think if there’s a message to deliver, the simpler the better. Fortunately, I’m able to play with extremely talented musicians. Tom [Warren], who plays bass, is a classically trained guitar player. Ciaran [O’Donnell] plays keyboards, trumpet, guitar, and cowbell, and Mat [Uychich] is a fantastic drummer with an incredible amount of rhythm. Because of them, this isn’t just poetry in front of a rattly acoustic guitar, though there is still room for that, obviously.

You have a distinctive twang to your singing voice — was that something you had to work toward?

It’s all natural, baby. People ask if I do vocal warmups. If I did vocal warmups and still sounded the way I sound, I’d be pissed. With my voice and the music, it was more important for people to hear us than for it to be good. In my singing, there’s a lot of emotion that I think people can connect with, whether my voice was beautiful like an opera singer or whether my voice sounded like a guy who had never sung before but had a microphone in front of him.

How was playing Coachella?

It was amazing. We were fortunate to play bigger festivals in Europe, so in my head I was like, How much bigger can this be? Everyone kept saying Coachella is the biggest, Coachella is the best, and they were right. We played at 2:30 in the afternoon on Friday, and there were people there! The hanging out was the best part. Once we got the show done, we got to mix and mingle with the celebrities. We saw Guy Fieri, Seal — Kanye West walked by. I was extremely impressed with everyone we saw play. LCD Soundsystem, Sufjan Stevens, Ice Cube, even Guns N’ Roses. It was an honor to be included.

What can the audience expect from your show at Revolution?

There’s that thing people talk about when they go to raves where you feel you’re not an individual, you’re part of a whole. Not that Front Bottoms shows are like raves, but there is that sense that everyone is here together to have a good time. We have stuff like whacky inflatable-arm guys, we’ve got bubble machines, the whole nine yards to keep it as entertaining as possible. I always say — in fact, they’re going to write it on my tombstone — “I’m not here to perform. I’m here to entertain.” DAVID ROLLAND

Feedback@BrowardPalmBeach.com

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